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Helping toSave the Frogs

Nine of Freddo’s friends from Australia and New Zealand are under threat of extinction. Scroll down to find out more about how Freddo will help his endangered friends, through collaboration with Zoos Victoria, Conservation Volunteers Australia, and Conservation Volunteers New Zealand.

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Front Page Frog

How We're Helping

Through Freddo’s partnership with Zoos Victoria, Conservation Volunteers Australia, and Conservation Volunteers New Zealand, he’s been helping to support key conservation programs to help his endangered friends, with over $600K pledged towards projects.

Conservation
Conservation

Zoos Victoria

Freddo and the conservation experts at Zoos Victoria have their work cut out for them to save the Northern Corroboree Frog from extinction, especially after the recent bushfires.

With a three-year plan in place, there are several different new and existing programs being used to help save them.

The first job is to assess the genetic structure of the captive populations to ensure that the breeding programs are optimal—meaning they’re working as efficiently as possible.

There is also quite a bit of research being done into thermal adaptation—learning if the frogs could possibly live in a slightly warmer habitat, in case they need to move somewhere else due to climate change or disease.

Over the three years, multiple institutions will be working together to support the Northern Corroboree Frog’s reintroduction into nature, and with Freddo’s support, they’ll hopefully live on for many years to come.

As a voice for wildlife, Zoos Victoria is devastated by the impact of the bushfire crisis on precious species and their habitat. Zoos Victoria is responding with expert care for impacted wildlife and we need your help to raise much-needed emergency funds.

Click below to donate to the Bushfire Emergency Wildlife Fund.

Zoos Victoria Hero Image
Zoos Victoria Hero Image

Conservation Volunteers Australia

The Spotted Tree Frog is now limited to a small number of locations. It is threatened by non-native trout that have been introduced into its mountain habitat and feed on tadpoles, reducing the numbers of frogs that survive in the next generation. And that’s not to mention the recent bushfires ravaging the region.

With a three-year commitment from Freddo, Conservation Volunteers Australia will now be able to intensify their conservation efforts.

In collaboration with the Spotted Tree Frog Recovery Team, the invasive trout reduction program will be supported in key Spotted Tree Frog habitats every autumn.

To find out what you can do to help support this project, click below.

Conservation Volunteers Australia Hero Image
Conservation Volunteers Australia Hero Image

Conservation Volunteers New Zealand

For years, Hochstetter’s Frog populations have been decimated by the predators of the Waitakere Ranges—namely, the rats and mustelids.

Conservation Volunteers New Zealand are already hard at work to protect the frogs, installing a series of trapping lines by track cutting, and installing bait stations and traps that target rats and mustelids.

Over three years, Freddo’s contribution towards these programs, will lead to stronger management of these threats, because these cute little frogs need all the help they can get.

With Freddo’s help, Conservation Volunteers New Zealand will be able to implement effective methods for keeping the predators in check, while making sure the frogs can thrive for many years to come.

Hochstetter’s Frog is a very slow-breeding species, so it might take a while for the population to bounce back, but with Freddo’s help, they’re surely on the right track.

To find out what you can do to help support this project, click below.

Conservation Volunteers New Zealand Hero Image
Conservation Volunteers New Zealand Hero Image